Texas Historical Markers – Booth, Texas


While out looking for the historical marker for Thompson’s Ferry in Richmond, my friend Steve and I saw a sign showing that we were nearing the town of Booth. I knew from previous research that there was an historical marker in Booth, so we switched gears and decided to head there and find the marker. I had no clue where the marker might be, so we looked it up on Google maps. For those of you who live in or near Booth, don’t laugh about us using Google maps. I had no clue that we were only dealing with a few streets! The map showed the historical marker to be located on Booth Road near FM2759. We couldn’t find it on Booth Road, but we did see a very interesting group of buildings that were intriguing enough to entice us to get a closer look.

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Once we got closer, we saw that the buildings were the ruins of an old school. We wanted to go explore the buildings, but there was a fence around the property and all kinds of “no trespassing” and “private property” signs. I’ve done my fair share of itty bitty trespassing just to get a good photograph of something, but the fence kept us law abiding citizens that day. I did some research on the school when I got home and found that it opened in 1912 and closed around 1947.

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Click image for easy to read closeup.

We got back in the car and headed down Booth Road back to FM2759. Once there we saw a sign that we obviously didn’t see before. It was one of those brown signs that points the way to an historical marker. Turns out, the marker wasn’t on Booth Road, it was on Agnes Road. Also on Agnes Road is a venue for events called The Old Trading Post. I’ve never been there, but I looked them up on Facebook. Looks like they have some fun times out there!

So we found the historical marker, read what it said, and took a few photos of it. The marker was put up in 1973. Like so many other places in Fort Bend County, Booth was part of the Stephen F. Austin colony. The property was granted to a man by the name of Henry Jones. Jones was one of Stephen F. Austin’s Old Three Hundred; he was one of over 57 of the colonists who received land in what is now Fort Bend County. For those of you who are new to the area or to the state, it might behoove you to do a little reading about Stephen F. Austin’s Old Three Hundred. You’ll find it quite interesting and a big part of what makes Texas history so fascinating.

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At some point in the 1890s, Freeman Irby Booth built a settlement on the land and named it after himself. The town prospered for a number of years and at one time boasted a population of around 300. By 1949, there were around 40 residents. I attempted to find the most recent population for Booth using the 2010 census data, but the website said that they had no record of the town of Booth. Today, any students who reside in the town attend schools in the Lamar Consolidated Independent School District.

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Doing this kind of research can lead you down roads where you’ve never been before. It can also lead you down roads where you’re not supposed to go! If you see a sign that says “Locked Gate Ahead – Turn Around Now,” you might want to do just that. I’m just thankful that my car has a rearview camera. Going backwards down a gravel road and up and over the railroad tracks was a little perilous! Steve didn’t say anything, but I’m pretty sure he was happy that we weren’t in his pristine white 2017 GMC Yukon!!!

We did a little bit more searching for that marker at Thompson’s Ferry, but we never could find it. We looked in two different places; there is a third place where we could have looked but comments on a website about looking for that particular marker mentioned really mean dogs and ‘shoot now, ask later’ kinds of signs. We decided to end our search for now and maybe try again later. If you have any clue where that marker might be located, please let us know.


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